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dc.contributor Ford, Richard L. en
dc.contributor.advisor Ford, Richard L. en
dc.contributor.author Urrutia, Kathleen en
dc.contributor.other Carter, Nancy J. en
dc.contributor.other Handa, Yuichi en
dc.date.accessioned 2014-10-14T22:43:19Z en
dc.date.available 2014-10-14T22:43:19Z en
dc.date.issued 2014-10-14 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10211.3/128693 en
dc.description.abstract This study investigated how implementing the mastery learning model with gamification techniques affected student achievement and motivation. At Inspire School of Arts and Sciences, many math teachers are challenged by students who are unmotivated and unengaged. In this study, an Algebra 1 teacher at Inspire implemented mastery learning with gamification into her class. Average test scores of 13 exams of students in a gamified Algebra 1 class were compared to the average test scores of 13 of the same exams in the traditional Algebra 1 class. Each Algebra 1 test consists of the following types of questions: Knowledge, Comprehension, Application, and Analysis, Synthesis, Evaluation. A statistical test was used to compare each category of the test between the gamified (treatment) group and the traditional group. The exam data was analyzed to determine the following:  How do the students’ average test scores in the gamified classroom compare to those of students in the traditional classroom?  Does the gamified approach have a larger impact on test performance with either the higher or lower block of students? A “Feelings About Mathematics” survey was also administered to all Algebra 1 students receiving the gamification treatment at the beginning of the school year with 23 Likert Score questions. The same survey was subsequently administered at the end of the year to all Algebra 1 students (gamification and traditional groups. The data was analyzed to determine if there was a difference between students’ attitude towards mathematics in the gamified classroom and the traditional classroom at the end of the school year and whether the gamified course opinions changed from the beginning of the school year to the end. The results of this study indicate the following: 1. Students in the gamified group scored significantly higher on average test scores throughout the school year. 2. Students in the gamified group scored significantly higher on the knowledge, comprehension, and application sections of the tests. There was no difference between the two groups on the synthesis, analysis, and evaluation section. 3. Students in the gamified group had a more positive attitude about mathematics than they did at the beginning of the year. 4. At the end of the school year students in the gamified group had a more positive attitude about mathematics than the traditional group. en
dc.description.sponsorship CSU, Chico en
dc.language.iso en_US en
dc.subject Gamification en
dc.subject Algebra 1 en
dc.subject Student achievement en
dc.title Gamification and algebra 1: will a gamified classroom increase student achievement and motivation? en
dc.college Natural Sciences en
dc.program Mathematics Education en
dc.degree MS en


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